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Big Break Regional Shoreline, Oakley
Big Break Regional Shoreline, Oakley    

Big Break Regional Shoreline is a part of the great 1150-square-mile Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta. The water flowing past Big Break through the Sacramento and San Joaquin-the State's two greatest rivers-drains half of California and creates the largest estuarine environment on the Pacific coast. This area is also referred to as the "Inland Coast."Big Break Regional Shoreline is a part of the great 1150-square-mile Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta. The water flowing past Big Break through the Sacramento and San Joaquin-the State's two greatest rivers-drains half of California and creates the largest estuarine environment on the Pacific coast. This area is also referred to as the "Inland Coast."

Birds: waterfowl, raptors.

Hiking Difficulty: 2

Directions:

  • From I680 northbound (from Walnut Creek), take 242 towards Concord/Pittsburg;
  • Take Highway 4 eastbound towards Stockton/Pittsburg;
  • Take right exit 30 toward CA-160/Sacramento/Rio Vista (just past Hillcrest Ave. exit; do NOT continue straight on Highway 4);
  • Merge onto CA-160;
  • Take exit 1-A East 18th/Main St. (first exit on Highway 160);
  • Turn right (east) at the bottom of the exit onto Main Street and proceed east for a little over a mile;
  • Turn left onto Big Break Road;
  • Turn right just past the last houses on the right into Big Break Regional Shoreline.

Hiking Difficulty codes:
1=Easy, very few hills to climb
2=Moderately Easy, some small hills to climb
3=Challenging, flat land ranging to gentle to some steep slopes
4=Difficult, some very steep hills to climb

At the Water Cooler


I'm lucky to have a lot of trees in my yard many of which are native to this area. I have one very large one that grows close to the house - a big kahuna that produces lots of acorns in certain years. This year, they're everywhere. Dropping on the cars in the driveway, hitting the roof. There are more acorns here than I've ever seen...

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East Bay Times Article


Attracting birds and bees to our yards and gardens is simple, if we provide what they like and need.

Joanie Smith, owner of East Bay Nature in Walnut Creek, says there are five essential elements for success water, food, cover, nesting and safety.

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